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Wedding Dates to Avoid For 2020, 2021, 2022 and 2023

Published date: 19th June 2020


Your wedding date will be imprinted on your mind as the most important date of the year and we bet you’re counting down the months and weeks until you can turn the calendar to reveal that special day.

But, imagine if that very same date is also at the forefront of many of your guests’ minds, but for a very different reason. Perhaps it’s a sporting event they simply cannot bear to miss or maybe it’s a public holiday and they had hoped to be on holiday then.

Choosing your wedding date shouldn’t just be a case of picking a season and seeing what dates the venue has to offer. It’s important to give this aspect of planning a bit more consideration or you might find yourself getting more than the average amount of ‘sorry, we can’t make it’ RSVPs or be the victims of pesky last-minute drop-outs.

To make sure your day is the most important in everyone’s social calendar that year, you might want to avoid several dates with events already planned in 2020, 2021 and 2022. We’ve put together a list of all the dates in the next few years that might be best to avoid if you don’t want half the congregation camped out in the bar watching the footie or worse, celebrating at some other event they said yes to first. And, it’s not just other events you need to watch out for.

To help you choose the perfect date for your big day, here are the UK dates to avoid if you’re planning a wedding in 2020, 2021, 2022 or 2023…

Personally Significant Days

As obvious as it sounds, the first thing to check is your own calendar. While your wedding is, of course, the most important date to you, it isn’t going to go down very well if you book it on the weekend of your mum’s 60th or sister’s 30th for example. Make sure to take into account family birthdays, anniversaries, and other family or friends’ weddings.

 

Big Sporting Events to Avoid

Believe us when we say, you don’t want to be the couple whose wedding takes place during a world cup final featuring England (in our dreams!), with guests sneakily watching the match on their phones rather than watching as you walk down the aisle.

Make sure to pay attention to where the sporting events are taking place too, in case the sudden increase in traffic plays havoc with your transport plans. If you’re getting married in Twickenham for example, you need to make sure you allow a lot of extra time and warn your guests of traffic jams if it’s during the Six Nations.

Here are the key sporting dates over the next few years to avoid or be prepared for…

2020 Sporting Events

Covid-19 has put paid to most sporting events for 2020 (including The Olympics), as well as a lot of weddings for that matter, but there are still a few dates to bear in mind that haven’t been cancelled or have already been postponed to later in the year.

1 August: Football (FA Cup final at Wembley)

2 August: Formula 1 (British Grand Prix at Silverstone)

25 – 27 September: Golf (Ryder Cup in Wisconsin)

4 October: London Marathon

18 October to 15 November: Cricket (ICC T20 World Cup)

12-15 November: Golf (Masters in Augusta)

2021 Sporting Events

6 February – 20 March: Rugby (Guinness Six Nations Tournament)

11 June – 11 July: Football (Euro 2020)

17 June – 4 July: Football (2021 FIFA World Cup)

28 June – 11 July: Tennis (Wimbledon Championships)

2 – 25 July: Cycling (Tour de France)

11 July – 1 August: Football (UEFA Women’s Euro Championships)

23 July – 8 August: Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

24 August – 5 September: Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games

30 August – 12 September: Tennis (US Open)

23 October – 27 November: Rugby League (World Cup)

2022 Sporting Events

4 – 20 February: Winter Olympic Games

4 – 13 March: Winter Paralympic Games

27 July – 7 August: Commonwealth Games

21 November – 18 December: Football (FIFA World Cup)

2023 Sporting Events

9 February – 26 March: Cricket (World Cup)

9 – 25 June: European Games

8 September – 21 October: Rugby (World Cup)

 

Unlucky Days to Avoid

Depending on your beliefs and superstitions you may or may not pay any notice of so-called unlucky dates to get married. But if you prefer to err on the side of caution, these are the dates that historically have been thought to prove unlucky for the couple getting married.

Friday the 13th days:
Friday 13 November 2020
Friday 13 August 2021
Friday 13 May 2022
Friday 13 January and Friday 13 October 2023

The Ides of March:
15 March

St Joseph’s Day:
19 March

Leap years:
2020 and 2024 are both leap years, so if you want to be able to celebrate all your anniversaries steer clear of 29 February.

 

Local Events to Avoid

Just imagine your surprise if you were getting married in London’s Soho and hadn’t checked when Pride was due to take place. Or perhaps you’ve chosen the last weekend in August and Notting Hill for your reception (err hello carnival!).

While the atmosphere for your big day would certainly be second to none, actually getting to your venue might be a little trickier with the celebratory crowds. Or it could be you’ve always dreamed of having a brilliant firework display to end your big day. You could “borrow” a display from a nearby Guy Fawkes event with a well-timed wedding or it might be best to completely steer clear of any November displays and have fireworks of your own that won’t be drowned out by larger events. Make sure to look up annual events that are local to your venue and check that they won’t get in the way of any plans.

Pride (across the UK at various dates in the year so check your local area info):
London Pride is on 26 June 2021, subsequent dates yet to be announced.

Notting Hill Carnival:
30 – 31 August 2020;
29 – 30 August 2021;
28 – 29 August 2022;
27 – 28 August 2023

Halloween (or nearest weekend):
29 – 31 October 2020
29 – 31 October 2021
28 – 30 October 2022
27 – 29 October 2023

Guy Fawkes Night:
5 November 2020, 2021, 2022, 2023

 

UK Public Holidays and Special Days to Avoid

Some couples specifically want to have their wedding on a bank holiday weekend so that they can make the most of a full three days’ worth of celebrating without anyone having to take time off work. This is often the case for destination weddings when longer journeys are involved.

The May and August UK bank holidays are particularly popular times for weddings… and unfortunately for holidays!

2020 Public Holidays

1 – 3 August:
Summer bank holiday weekend Scotland

29 – 31 August:
Summer bank holiday weekend

28 – 30 November:
St Andrew’s Day (Scotland)

24 – 26 December:
Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and Boxing Day

31 December:
New Year’s Eve

2021 Public Holidays

1 January:
New Year’s Day

4 January:
Public Holiday Scotland

1 March:
St David’s Day (Wales)

17 March:
St Patrick’s Day (Ireland)

14 March:
Mother’s Day

2 – 5 April:
Good Friday, Easter Sunday, and Easter Monday

1 – 3 May:
Early May Bank Holiday weekend

29 – 31 May:
Spring Bank Holiday Weekend

20 June:
Father’s Day

31 July – 2 August:
Bank Holiday Weekend Scotland

28 – 30 August:
Bank Holiday Weekend

30 November:
St Andrew’s Day Scotland

24 – 26 December:
Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and Boxing Day

31 December:
New Year’s Eve

 

2022 Public Holidays

1 January:
New Year’s Day

3 January:
Substitute Bank Holiday for New Year’s Day

4 January:
Public Holiday Scotland

1 March:
St David’s Day (Wales)

17 March:
St Patrick’s Day (Ireland)

27 March:
Mother’s Day

15 – 18 April:
Good Friday, Easter Sunday, and Easter Monday

30 April – 2 May:
Early May Bank Holiday weekend

28 – 30 May:
Spring Bank Holiday Weekend

19 June:
Father’s Day

1 – 3 August:
Bank Holiday Weekend Scotland

27 – 29 August:
Bank Holiday Weekend

30 November:
St Andrew’s Day Scotland

24 – 26 December:
Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, and Boxing Day

27 December:
Substitute Bank Holiday for Christmas Day

31 December:
New Year’s Eve

2023 Public Holidays

1 January:
New Year’s Day

2 January:
Substitute Bank Holiday for New Year’s Day

3 January:
Public Holiday Scotland

1 March:
St David’s Day (Wales)

17 March:
St Patrick’s Day (Ireland)

19 March:
Mother’s Day

7 – 10 April:
Good Friday, Easter Sunday, and Easter Monday

29 April – 1 May:
Early May Bank Holiday weekend

27 – 29 May:
Spring Bank Holiday Weekend

18 June:
Father’s Day

5 – 7 August:
Bank Holiday Weekend Scotland

26 – 28 August:
Bank Holiday Weekend

30 November:
St Andrew’s Day Scotland

24 – 26 December:
Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and Boxing Day

31 December:
New Year’s Eve

Religious Holidays to Avoid

Even if you’re not religious yourselves, some religious holidays may have an impact on the date you might want to book your wedding. If a large percentage of your guests are Muslim and you plan your wedding during Ramadan for example, then they will be fasting during daylight hours and won’t be able to enjoy your three-course wedding feast and may choose not to attend.

Easter
Palm Sunday:
28 March 2021
10 April 2022
2 April 2023

Easter Sunday:
4 April 2021
17 April 2022
2 April 2023

Passover
From sunset on:
27 March 2021;
15 April 2022;
5 April 2023

Ramadan (can vary based on the lunar calendar)
12 April – 11 May 2021
2 April – 1 May 2022
22 March – 20 April 2023

Ram Navami
21 April 2021
10 April 2022
30 March 2023

Eid al-Fitr (can vary based on the lunar calendar)

12 – 13 May 2021
2 – 3 May 2022
21 – 22 April 2023

Eid al-Adha

30 July 2020
19 July 2021
9 July 2022
28 June 2023

Tisha B’Av
From sunset on:
17 July 2021;
5 August 2022;
26 July 2023

Rosh Hashanah
From sunset until nightfall on:
18 – 20 September 2020
6 – 8 September 2021
25 – 27 September 2022
15 – 17 September 2023

Yom Kippur
From sunset until nightfall on:
27 – 28 September 2020
15 – 16 September 2021
4 – 5 October 2022
24 – 25 September 2023

Hanukkah

From sunset until nightfall on:
10 – 18 December 2020
28 November – 6 December 2021
18 – 26 December 2022
7 – 15 December 2023

Christmas
December 25: Friday in 2020, Saturday in 2021, Sunday in 2022, and Monday in 2023

Krishna Janmashtami
11 August 2020
30 August 2021
18 August 2022
6 September 2023

Days of Remembrance
Remembrance Day: 11 November 2020, 2021, 2022 and 2023

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